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Java Web Services for Experienced Programmers

Table of Contents

© 1992-2005. Deitel & Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.


 

Illustrations

xvi

 

Preface

xxix

1

Introduction

1

1.1

Introduction

2

1.2

Computing Advancements and Web Services

3

1.2.1

3

1.2.2

4

1.2.3

5

1.2.4

6

1.3

Emergence of Web Services

7

1.4

Web Services Advantages

8

1.5

Real Web Services

9

1.6

Web Services Challenges

11

1.7

Java Web Services Software

12

1.7.1

12

1.7.2

12

1.7.3

13

1.8

Tour of the Book

15

1.9

Summary

20

2

Creating Markup with XML

23

2.1

Introduction

24

2.2

Introduction to XML Markup

24

2.3

Parsers and Well-Formed XML Documents

27

2.4

Characters

28

2.4.1

28

2.4.2

28

2.5

CDATA Sections and Processing Instructions

30

2.6

XML Namespaces

32

2.7

Summary

35

2.8

Internet and World Wide Web Resources

35

3

Document Type Definition (DTD)

37

3.1

Introduction

38

3.2

Parsers and Well-Formed and Valid XML Documents

38

3.3

Document Type Declaration

39

3.4

Element Type Declarations

40

3.4.1

42

3.4.2

45

3.5

Attribute Declarations

47

3.6

Attribute Types

48

3.6.1

49

3.6.2

54

3.7

Conditional Sections

55

3.8

Whitespace Characters

56

3.9

Summary

58

3.10

Internet and World Wide Web Resources

59

4

Document Object Model (DOM)

60

4.1

Introduction

61

4.2

DOM with Java

62

4.3

DOM Components

66

4.4

Creating Nodes

73

4.5

Traversing the DOM

77

4.6

Summary

81

4.7

Internet and World Wide Web Resources

81

5

XSL: Extensible Stylesheet Language Transformations (XSLT)

82

5.1

Introduction

83

5.2

Applying XSLTs with Java

83

5.3

Simple Transformation Example

85

5.4

Creating Elements and Attributes

87

5.5

Iteration and Sorting

90

5.6

Conditional Processing

94

5.7

Combining Style Sheets

96

5.8

Summary

104

5.9

Internet and World Wide Web Resources

105

6

SOAP-Based Web-Services Platforms

106

6.1

Introduction

108

6.2

Developing a Web Service

109

6.3

Axis

110

6.3.1

110

6.3.2

111

6.3.3

111

6.3.4

113

6.4

CapeConnect 3.5

114

6.4.1

114

6.4.2

115

6.4.3

117

6.4.4

119

6.5

GLUE Standard 3.0

122

6.5.1

123

6.5.2

123

6.5.3

124

6.5.4

130

6.6

IONA Orbix E2A XMLBus 5.2

131

6.6.1

131

6.6.2

131

6.6.3

135

6.6.4

139

6.7

WASP Server for Java 4.0

140

6.7.1

142

6.7.2

143

6.7.3

144

6.7.4

146

6.8

Developing a Web-Services Client

149

6.8.1

149

6.8.2

150

6.9

Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP)

153

6.10

156

6.11

157

7

Web Services Description Language

158

7.1

Introduction

159

7.2

History of WSDL

159

7.3

Role of WSDL in Web Services

159

7.4

WSDL Document Structure

160

7.5

WSDL Document Generation

164

7.6

Using WSDL in Developing a Web-Service Client

170

7.7

Remote Web-Service Invocation Using WSDL

174

7.8

Summary

185

8

UDDI, Discovery and Web Services Registries

187

8.1

Introduction

188

8.2

Discovery

189

8.3

SOAP, UDDI and WSDL

189

8.4

Universal Description, Discovery and Integration (UDDI)

190

8.4.1

191

8.4.2

191

8.5

Role of UDDI in Web Services

192

8.5.1

192

8.5.2

192

8.5.3

197

8.6

UDDI Registries

198

8.6.1

198

8.6.2

203

8.7

Limitations of UDDI

203

8.8

Other Discovery Technologies

204

8.8.1

204

8.8.2

205

8.9

Summary

206

8.10

Internet and Web Resources

207

9

Java API for XML-Based Remote Procedure Calls (JAX-RPC)

211

9.1

Introduction

212

9.2

JAX-RPC Overview

213

9.3

Simple Web Service: Vote Service

214

9.3.1

216

9.3.2

217

9.3.3

218

9.3.4

221

9.3.5

226

9.4

Improved Vote Service

257

9.4.1

259

9.4.2

263

9.4.3

267

9.5

Accessing Web Services Written by a Third Party

271

9.5.1

272

9.5.2

272

9.6

Summary

278

9.7

Internet and World Wide Web Resources

279

10

Java API for XML Registries (JAXR)

280

10.1

Introduction

281

10.1.1

282

10.1.2

282

10.2

Registering for XML Registry Access

284

10.2.1

284

10.2.2

285

10.3

Connecting to an XML Registry

285

10.4

Registering Business Profile

288

10.4.1

300

10.5

Querying Registries Using JAXR

301

10.6

Removing Business Profile

310

10.7

Query Manager and Life Cycle Manager Providers’ URLs

317

10.8

Summary

318

10.9

Internet and World Wide Web Resources

319

11

JAXM and SAAJ

320

11.1

Introduction

321

11.2

Java Messaging APIs

321

11.3

JAXM and SAAJ

322

11.4

Standalone JAXM Clients and JAXM Web Services

323

11.5

JAXM Application with Message Provider

339

11.6

Summary

370

12

Computer and Internet Security

372

12.1

Introduction

373

12.2

Ancient Ciphers to Modern Cryptosystems

374

12.3

Secret-Key Cryptography

375

12.4

Public-Key Cryptography

377

12.5

Cryptanalysis

380

12.6

Key Agreement Protocols

380

12.7

Key Management

381

12.8

Digital Signatures

382

12.9

Public-Key Infrastructure, Certificates and Certificate Authorities

383

12.9.1

385

12.10

Security Protocols

386

12.10.1

386

12.10.2

387

12.11

Authentication and Authorization

388

12.11.1

389

12.11.2

389

12.11.3

390

12.12

Security Attacks

391

12.12.1

392

12.12.2

392

12.12.3

394

12.13

Network Security

395

12.13.1

395

12.13.2

396

12.14

Steganography

397

12.15

Summary

398

12.16

Internet and Web Resources

400

13

Web Services Security

408

13.1

Introduction

409

13.2

Basic Security for Transmissions over HTTP

410

13.3

Web Services and Secure Sockets Layer (SSL)

411

13.4

XML Signature and XML Encryption

412

13.5

XML Key Management Specification (XKMS)

418

13.6

Security Assertion Markup Language (SAML)

422

13.7

Extensible Access Control Markup Language (XACML)

426

13.8

Authentication and Authorization for Web Services

430

13.9

Web Services and Network Security

431

13.10

Summary

432

13.11

Internet and Web Resources

433

14

Wireless Web Services and Java 2 Micro Edition

439

14.1

Introduction

440

14.2

Java 2 Micro Edition

440

14.2.1

440

14.2.2

444

14.3

Using J2ME to Access Web Services via Servlets

447

14.4

Using J2ME to Access Web Services via Enhydra’s kSOAP

460

14.5

Summary

466

14.6

Internet and World Wide Web Resources

467

15

Case Study Architecture and Web-Service Implementations

469

15.1

Introduction

470

15.2

Price Finder Application Architecture

470

15.3

Deitel Book Information Web Service

472

15.4

Bookstore Implementations

475

15.5

Price Finder Web Services

493

15.5.1

499

15.5.2

507

15.5.3

507

16

Case Study Client Applications

517

16.1

Introduction

518

16.2

Servlet-based Web Client

518

16.2.1

519

16.2.2

521

16.2.3

524

16.2.4

524

16.2.5

529

16.2.6

532

16.2.7

534

16.3

Swing Desktop Client

536

16.4

Java™ 2 Micro Edition Wireless Client

545

17

Case Study Deployment

569

17.1

Introduction

570

17.2

Deploying the Bookstore Web Services

570

17.2.1

570

17.2.2

571

17.2.3

574

17.2.4

576

17.3

Book Information Web Service Deployment Instructions

577

17.4

PriceFinder Deployment Instructions

577

A

Servlets

583

A.1

Introduction

584

A.2

Servlet Overview and Architecture

586

A.2.1

587

A.2.2

589

A.2.3

590

A.2.4

591

A.3

Handling HTTP get Requests

592

A.3.1

596

A.3.2

597

A.4

Handling HTTP get Requests Containing Data

602

A.5

Handling HTTP post Requests

605

A.6

Redirecting Requests to Other Resources

608

A.7

Session Tracking

612

A.7.1

613

A.7.2

621

A.8

Multi-Tier Applications: Using JDBC from a Servlet

630

A.9

HttpUtils Class

637

A.10

Summary

637

A.11

Internet and World Wide Web Resources

641

B

JavaServer Pages (JSP)

643

B.1

Introduction

644

B.2

JavaServer Pages Overview

645

B.3

A First JavaServer Page Example

646

B.4

Implicit Objects

648

B.5

Scripting

649

B.5.1

650

B.5.2

651

B.6

Standard Actions

654

B.6.1

655

B.6.2

660

B.6.3

663

B.6.4

667

B.7

Directives

684

B.7.1

684

B.7.2

686

B.8

Custom Tag Libraries

688

B.8.1

689

B.8.2

693

B.8.3

697

B.9

Summary

703

B.10

Internet and World Wide Web Resources

706

Index

707

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© 1992-2005. Deitel & Associates, Inc. All Rights Reserved.